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Buying Process


Buying Process

Make A Game Plan

Buying a home is a time of enormous possibilities and intense preparation. Doing some preliminary planning before you begin your home search will make the entire process more manageable and less . overwhelming. As part of your initial game plan, you should:

Check Your Credit Rating

Even if you’re sure you have excellent credit, it’s wise to double-check at the outset. Straightening out any errors or disputed items now will avoid troublesome holdups down the road when you’re waiting for mortgage approval.
You may see disputed items, in addition to errors caused by a faulty social security number, a name similar to yours, or a court ordered judgment you paid off that hasn’t been cleared from the public records. If such items appear, write a letter to the appropriate credit bureau. Credit bureaus are required to help you straighten things out in a reasonable time (usually 30 days).

TIP:
Make sure that any outdated derogatory entries are deleted from your credit file. Adverse credit information is not supposed to be reported or included on your credit report after seven years (except bankruptcy information, which can be reported up to ten years).

TIP:
Officially cancel inactive credit cards. If you have an inactive credit card with a $5,000 limit, even though you owe nothing on it, some mortgage lenders will consider that a potential future debt. Too many inactive credit cards with significant credit limits could keep you from obtaining a mortgage loan. Don’t just cut up your extra cards; officially cancel them, and do it now so there will be time for the news to reach the credit bureaus.

TIP:
Hold off on making any major credit card or car purchases while you’re waiting to apply for a mortgage. Monthly payments you’re obligated to pay will be counted against you, and reduce the amount of the mortgage loan you’ll be offered. Even if you’ve been pre-approved for a mortgage, that approval is subject to last-minute evaluation of your financial situation, and a spending spree for appliances, furniture and other goodies intended for your new home may wreck your chances for buying it.

Pre-qualification and Pre-approval on a Mortgage

Any reputable real estate broker will “pre-qualify” you for a mortgage before you start house-hunting. This process includes analyzing your income, assets and present debt to estimate what you may be able to afford on a house purchase. Mortgage brokers, or a lender’s own mortgage counselors can also calculate the same sort of informal estimate for you.
Obtaining mortgage “pre-approval” is another thing entirely. It means that you have in hand a lender’s written commitment to put together a loan for you (subject only to the particular house you want to buy passing the lender’s appraisal). Pre-approval makes you a strong buyer, welcomed by sellers. With most other purchasers, sellers must tie the house up on a contract while waiting to see if the would-be buyer can really obtain financing. The down side is that you must pay application fees to cover the lender’s paperwork in verifying your employment, income, assets, debts and credit rating. If you later decide not to use that particular lender, you’d have to start all over again elsewhere – with no rebate. Pre-approval will also speed up the entire mortgage procedure once you’ve found the house you want. The only remaining question will be whether the house will “appraise” for enough to warrant the loan.

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Become an Educated Buyer: Research Neighborhoods
Read Ads and Visit Open Houses

If you were changing cities, the standard advice used to be to subscribe to the local newspaper in the new town and start reading local news and classified ads to get a feeling for different neighborhoods. Although that’s still a good idea, you can simplify and streamline the house-hunting process by using the Internet to Find a Home, Find a REALTOR® , and Find Related Services.

For local moves, you have the advantage of driving around neighborhoods that interest you and looking at lawn signs. Particularly on weekends, you will see “Open House” postings. Don’t hesitate to walk in, even if you’re not ready to buy yet. Visiting open houses is an excellent way to familiarize yourself with the market and judge various real estate agents you may meet along the way, and it won’t put you under obligation to anyone.

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Your Wish List

Making sure you end up with the right home involves figuring out exactly what features you need, want and don’t want in a home. Before starting your search, you should make a “wish list” to decide which features are absolutely essential, which are nice “extras” if you happen to find them, and which are completely undesirable.
The more specific you can be about what you’re looking for from the outset, the more effective your home search will be. Also keep in mind, that in the end, every home purchase is a compromise.

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Assess Your Finances

There’s no point wasting time and energy house-hunting before you know what you can afford. So your next step is to assess your finances:

At the start of a mortgage repayment schedule, when the debt hasn’t been reduced yet, almost all of your monthly payment goes toward interest. A bit goes toward reducing principal (the amount borrowed), so that the next month you’re borrowing a bit less, and owe a little less interest. That allows more of your next payment to go toward reducing principal. However, this process is very slow in the beginning and the interest portion remains high for many years.
Between the mortgage interest and the property tax deductions, you can figure that Uncle Sam is shouldering part of your monthly mortgage payment – 28% of it, in fact, if that’s your tax bracket. Your state income tax bracket can also be added to that, before you calculate how much you save on income tax as a homeowner.

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Interest Rates and How They Change

As you start shopping for a home loan, your first question of each lender will probably be “What’s your interest rate? How much are you charging?”

Interest rates are usually expressed as an annual percentage of the amount borrowed. If you borrowed $120,000 at 10% interest, you’d owe interest of $12,000 for the first year. With most mortgage plans you’d pay it at the rate of $1,000 a month. You would also send in something each month to reduce the principal debt you owe – and the next month you’d owe a bit less interest.

When your grandparents bought their home (putting at least half the purchase price down, by the way), their interest rate was probably around 4 or 5%. Rates stayed the same for years at a time. Then in the years following World War II, things became more turbulent.

As economic changes speeded up, rates began to change several times a year. By the l980s, lenders were setting new rates on mortgage loans as often as once a week – and they still do today. When inflation hit a high in the ’80s, some mortgage loans carried interest rates as high as 17% – and those who absolutely needed to buy, paid that much.

Rates dropped gradually through the 1990s, and by 1998 had reached their lowest rates in decades. Heading toward the millenium, home buyers appear to have the most favorable conditions for mortgage borrowing since their grandparents’ days – and without 50% down payments either.

Closing Costs
On the day you actually buy your new home, in addition to your down payment and the prepaid property tax and homeowners insurance premiums, you’ll need cash for various fees associated with the purchase. These expenses are known as closing costs and are paid by both buyers and sellers.

Some closing costs you pay up-front when you apply for a mortgage loan. That includes money for a credit check on all applicants and an appraisal on the property. Keep in mind that even if you don’t eventually receive the loan, that money is not refundable.

Other closing costs are possible and should be considered when evaluating your financial situation. These may include, but are not limited to:

  1. Title insurance fee;
  2. Survey charge;
  3. Loan origination fee;
  4. Attorney fees or escrow fees;
  5. Document preparation fee;
  6. Garbage or trash collection fees; and the big one
  7. Points – up-front interest paid in return for a lower interest rate. Each point is one percent of the loan amount. Sometimes you can contract for the seller to pay your points. TIP:
    Consider closing costs when choosing one mortgage plan over another. The good news is that if your cash is limited, some mortgage plans allow the seller to pay some or all of your closing costs, such as title insurance, escrow fees, and points. Certain closing costs can sometimes be added to the amount of mortgage loan you’re receiving.[Back to top]

    Figuring Out Your Monthly Income
    When you apply for a home loan (and even long before that, when you first speak to a REALTOR®) the first question may likely be “How much is your income?” In making this determination, lenders consider the income of all parties who will be owners of the property. Be prepared to provide a monthly accounting of all sources of income.

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    Figuring Out Your Monthly Debt
    Lenders are interested mainly in your present monthly payments because they want to be sure you can handle the mortgage payment you’ll be applying for. Different mortgage plans consider payments on any debt that won’t be paid off within, for example, six months, nine months, or a year. Calculate the monthly debt of you and all your co-borrowers (if applicable).

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    Amount of Your Down Payment
    Your down payment is paid in cash and is not included as part of the loan amount. The bigger your initial down payment, the smaller your loan, which reduces the amount of your payments.

    How much you’ll put down depends on the cash you have available and the amounts you’ll need for closing costs and prepaid property taxes and homeowners’ insurance. Mortgage plans have various down payment requirements and they can range from 0% down on a VA (Veterans Administration) loan to between 3 and 5% down on a FHA (Federal Housing Administration) loans to 20% down, the traditional amount for a conventional loan. In addition, special state programs for first-time home buyers may set different sums, which are usually lower than conventional financing.If you put less than 20% down on most loans, you’ll be asked to protect the lender by carrying private mortgage insurance (PMI). Carrying PMI ensures that the debt is repaid if you default on the loan. This adds approximately an extra half a percent onto the loan.FHA mortgages, in return for their low-down-payment requirements, also charge for mortgage insurance premiums (MIP).[Back to top]

    How Much House Can You Afford?
    The amount of loan for which you qualify is based on two different calculations. Using what are known as qualification ratios, lenders evaluate your income and long-term debts to determine a “safe”
    amount for your mortgage payments. A fairly standard ratio is 28/33. Certain mortgage plans sometimes use more liberal ratios – for example, the FHA currently uses 29/41.

    Here’s how it works: With a 28/33 ratio, you’d be allowed to spend up to 28% of your gross monthly income for mortgage payments.The lender will then run a different calculation. This one is your loan payment and debt payments combined, which may not exceed 33% of your gross monthly income.To calculate exactly how much you may borrow, you also need an estimate of current interest rates.For Example: Suppose you had $1,000 a month for mortgage payment; at 7% that would let you borrow about $160,000 on a 30-year loan. At 6% the loan amount would be nearly $175,000. If your rate were 8%, the loan amount would be a bit less than $150,000.As part of this calculation, you also need to estimate and include the property taxes, homeowner’s insurance, and Homeowner Association fees (if applicable) you might need to pay, which are considered part of your monthly expense.

Use our Mortgage Calculator to determine how much you can afford.

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About Mortgages

Shopping for the right loan is just as important as choosing the right house. Your challenge is to select the loan terms that are most favorable to your situation. In selecting the loan that’s right for you, you’ll need to understand:

Basic Components of a Mortgage Loan
A mortgage requires you to pledge your home as the lender’s security for repayment of your loan. The lender agrees to hold the title or deed to your property (or in some states, to hold a lien on your title or deed) until you have paid back your loan plus interest.

The following are the basic components of a mortgage loan:

Mortgage Amount and Term
The mortgage amount is the amount of money you borrow from a lender to pay for your house. The term is the number of years over which you can pay back the amount you borrow.

TIP:
The length of your mortgage repayment period will directly affect your monthly mortgage payments.

The most popular mortgage term is 30 years. By extending payment over 30 years, you keep your monthly housing costs low. If you can afford higher monthly payments, you can select a mortgage term that is shorter. There are 20-year, 15-year, and even 10-year fixed-rate mortgages available from most mortgage lenders. The longer your repayment period is, the lower your monthly payments will be, but the total interest you pay over the life of the loan will be more.


Amortization
Over time, you will repay your mortgage through regular monthly payments of principal and interest. During the first few years, most of your payments will be applied toward the interest you owe. During the final years of your loan, your payment amounts will be applied primarily to the remaining principal. This type of repayment method is called amortization.
Fixed or Adjustable Interest Rates
Interest rates are usually expressed as an annual percentage of the amount borrowed. You can choose a mortgage with an interest rate that is fixed for the entire term of the loan or one that changes throughout. A fixed-rate loan gives you the security of knowing that your interest rate will never change during the term of the loan. An adjustable-rate mortgage (called an ARM) has an interest rate that will vary during the life of the loan, with the possibility of both increases and decreases to the interest rate and consequently to your mortgage payments.
Down Payment
The down payment is the part of the purchase price the buyer pays in cash and is not financed with a mortgage. Your down payment will reduce the amount you’ll need to borrow. So, the more cash you put down, the smaller the size of your loan, and the smaller the amount of your mortgage payments.

TIP:
Lenders often view mortgages with larger down payments as more secure because more of your own money is invested in the property. However, there are other loans that require as little as 3% to 5% of the purchase price for a down payment.


Closing Costs
The closing (or, in some parts of the country, settlement) is the final step, during which ownership of the home is transferred to you. The purpose of the closing is to make sure the property is ready and able to be transferred from the seller. The closing costs (which vary from state to state) are usually expressed as a percentage of the sales price or loan amount. Typically, costs range from 3% to 6% of the price of your home and can include transfer and recordation taxes, title insurance, the site survey fee, attorney fees, loan discount points, and document preparation fees.

TIP:
Sometimes you can negotiate to have the seller pay some of your closing costs.


Discount Points
In the special vocabulary of mortgage lending, “points” are a type of fee that lenders charge. (The full term to describe this fee is “discount points.”) Simply put, a point is a unit of measure that means 1% of the loan amount. So, if you take out a $100,000 loan, one point equals $1,000. Discount points represent additional money you can pay at closing to the lender to get a lower interest rate on your loan. Usually, for each point on a 30-year loan, your interest rate is reduced by about 1/8th (or .125) of a percentage point.

TIP: Usually, the longer you plan to stay in your home, the more sense it makes to pay discount points.

Conforming and Nonconforming Loans
The term “conforming,” as opposed to “nonconforming,” is sometimes used to explain loans that offer terms and conditions that follow the guidelines set forth by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. These are the two private, congressionally chartered companies that buy mortgage loans from lenders, thereby ensuring that mortgage funds are available at all times in all locations around the country.

The most important difference between a loan that conforms to Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac guidelines and one that doesn’t is its loan limit. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will purchase loans only up to a certain loan limit (currently $227,150, but will be $240,000 as of January 1, 1999).

If your loan amount will be for more than the conforming loan limit, the interest rate on your mortgage may be higher or you may have slightly different underwriting requirements, particularly in regard to your required down payment amount. Check with your lender about this if you are taking out a large loan amount.

TIP: Nonconforming loans are sometimes called jumbo loans.

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Fixed-Rate Mortgages
The interest rate may be your main consideration if you expect to stay in your house for a long time. With a fixed-rate mortgage, you can be sure that your interest rate will stay the same for the entire life of your loan. Fixed-rate mortgages are available in a variety of repayment terms, with 15, 20, and 30 years the most common.

30-Year Fixed-Rate:

The easiest fixed-rate loan to qualify for, the 30-year mortgage, gives you an excellent opportunity to keep mortgage payments reasonable by making monthly payments over a long period of time. This mortgage loan may be ideal if you plan to remain in your home for years and wish to keep your housing expense low and use any extra cash for other purposes. This loan also
provides maximum interest deduction for tax purposes.

20-Year Fixed-Rate: For those who want a lower interest rate and want to own their homes free of debt sooner, this shorter mortgage amortizes principal and interest over just 20 years, saving a considerable amount of total interest paid over the life of the loan.

15-Year Fixed-Rate: This shorter-term mortgage will save you a significant amount of interest over the life of the loan. By paying off the mortgage more quickly, you also build up equity in your home sooner. This may be important if you are approaching retirement or have other large expenses to cover, such as financing your children’s education. However, the monthly payments you make on a 15-year mortgage will cost you more than those you would make on a 30- or 20-year loan.

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Adjustable-Rate Mortgages (ARMs)
With an adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM), the interest rate you pay is adjusted from time to time to keep it in line with changing market rates. When interest rates go down, so might your mortgage payments; but keep in mind that your payments could go up when interest rates are raised.

ARMs are attractive because they may initially offer a lower interest rate than fixed-rate mortgages. Since the monthly payments on an ARM start out lower than those of a fixed-rate mortgage of the same amount, you can qualify for a larger loan. The chief drawback, of course, is that your monthly payments may increase when interest rates rise.

You may want to consider an ARM if:

  1. You are confident your income will rise enough in the coming years to comfortably handle any increase in payments;
  2. You plan to move in a few years and therefore are not so concerned about possible interest rate increases; or

You need a lower initial rate to afford to buy the home you want.

An ARM has two “caps” or limits on how large an interest rate increase is permitted. One cap sets the most that your interest rate can go up during each adjustment period, and the other cap sets the maximum total amount of all interest adjustments over the life of the loan.

For example, a typical ARM that adjusts annually may have a yearly cap of 2%, meaning that the adjusted interest rate can never be more than 2% higher than the previous year. And such an ARM may have a lifetime rate cap of 6%, meaning that the interest rate on your loan will never be more than 6% over the original rate. So, if you are looking at an ARM with a current introductory rate of 5%, a lifetime cap of 6% tells you that the highest interest rate you could ever pay would be 11%.

TIP: Before applying for an ARM, be sure you know how high your monthly payments could go – the “worst-case scenario.” Only you can determine if you would feel comfortable paying this interest rate sometime in the future.

Your lender can tell you which ARMs offer a conversion feature that allows you to convert from an adjustable rate to a fixed rate at certain times during the life of your loan.

One important thing to know when comparing ARMs is that the interest rate changes on an ARM are always tied to a financial index. A financial index is a published number or percentage, such as the average interest rate or yield on Treasury bills.

The following are the most common types of ARMs:

CD-Indexed ARMs (Certificate of Deposit): After an initial six-month period, the initial rate and payments adjust every six months. These ARMs typically come with a per-adjustment cap of 1% and a lifetime rate cap of 6%.

Treasury-Indexed ARMs: These are tied to the weekly average yield of U.S. Treasury Securities adjusted to a constant maturity of six months, one year, or three years. Likewise, the interest rate on your ARM will adjust once every six months, once each year, or once every three years, depending on the schedule you choose. Per-adjustment caps and lifetime rate caps also vary.

Cost of Funds-Indexed ARMs: Indexed to the actual costs that a particular group of institutions pays to borrow money, the most popular of this type is the COFi for the 11th Federal Home Loan Bank District. COFi ARMs can adjust every month, every six months, or every year, and the per-adjustment caps and lifetime rate caps vary.

Initial Fixed-Period ARMs: As protection against rapid interest rate increases in the early years of your loan, interest rates for these ARMs don’t adjust until several years after you take out the loan. You can choose from three, five, seven, or 10-year fixed terms. At the end of your chosen fixed-rate period, your interest rate would adjust every year.

Two-Step Mortgage®: This special type of ARM provides the benefit of initial low rates with the stability of longer term financing because it adjusts only once – either at seven years or at five years. After that initial adjustment, the mortgage maintains a fixed rate for the remaining 23 or 25 years of a 30-year mortgage repayment term. For example, if your initial interest rate were 8%, you would pay that rate for the first seven (or five) years. Then, for the remaining 23 (or 25) years, you would pay an interest rate that is indexed to the value of the 10-year U.S. Treasury security on the adjustment date. (At the adjustment date, there is no additional refinancing cost, no forms to complete, and no re-qualification necessary.) This new rate can never be more than 6 percentage points higher than your old rate. There are no limits on how much lower the adjusted interest rate can be.

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Government Loans and Programs
The Federal Housing Administration (FHA), the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), and the Rural Housing Services (RHS) are three agencies that offer government-insured loans. To obtain these loans, you apply through a lender that is approved to handle them. All require that the properties being purchased meet certain minimum standards.

Various types of government loans include:

FHA Loans: With FHA insurance, you can purchase a home with a very low down payment (from 3% to 5% of the FHA appraisal value or the purchase price, whichever is lower). FHA mortgages have a maximum loan limit that varies depending on the average cost of housing in a given region.

VA Loans: The VA guarantee allows qualified veterans to buy a house costing up to $203,000 with no down payment. Moreover, the qualification guidelines for VA loans are more flexible than those for either FHA or conventional loans. To determine whether you are eligible, check with your nearest regional VA office.

RHS Loans: The Rural Housing Service, a branch of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, offers low-interest-rate homeownership loans with no down payment requirements to low and moderate-income persons who live in rural areas or small towns.

State and Local Loan Programs: A number of states sponsor programs to help first-time home buyers qualify for mortgages. Local housing agencies also offer, in some areas, attractive loan terms, such as low down payments or low interest rates, to home buyers who meet specified income guidelines. Some state and local programs may also offer down payment and closing cost assistance. Check with your state housing authority. You can find the office nearest you online or look in the government “blue pages” of your phone book.

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Balloon Loans
Balloon loans offer lower interest rates for shorter term financing, usually five, seven, or 10 years. At the end of this term, they require refinancing or paying off the outstanding balance with a lump-sum payment. Balloon mortgages may be suitable if you plan to sell or refinance your home within a few years and want a fixed, low monthly payment.

The advantage they offer is an interest rate that is lower than that of a fully amortizing fixed-rate mortgage. For example, your initial interest rate may be 7.5%, and you would pay that for the first five, seven, or 10 years (depending on the term of your balloon loan). Then, your entire outstanding loan balance would be due to the lender or you might have to pay a fee to refinance your loan at the prevailing interest rate.

Be sure to ask about all the conditions for a refinance option at the end of the balloon term. With some balloon mortgages, the lender doesn’t guarantee to extend the loan past the balloon date. If you don’t feel you will be able to meet all the refinance conditions or think the balloon term may be up before you are ready to move, this type of loan may not be appropriate for you.

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Other Affordable Housing Loans
Fannie Mae® offers a variety of low and moderate-income households mortgage loan options that help overcome common barriers to homeownership. Fannie Mae loans require less cash at closing and for a down payment, in addition to flexible underwriting ratios, making it easier for qualifying individuals to get into a new home sooner and use more of their monthly income toward housing costs than permitted by other mortgage loans.

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Choose a Realtor
Some home buyers work exclusively with a buyer’s broker, specifically hired to represent them. Some work with sellers’ brokers. In either case, choosing the right REALTOR® is a crucial first step in the home buying process. In making this important decision you should understand:
Who is a REALTOR®?
The terms agent, broker and REALTOR® are often used interchangeably, but have very different meanings. For example, not all agents (also called salespersons) or brokers are REALTORS®. Learn the reasons why you should use a REALTOR®.

As a prerequisite to selling real estate, a person must be licensed by the state in which they work, either as an agent/salesperson or as a broker. Before a license is issued, minimum standards for education, examinations and experience, which are determined on a state by state basis, must be met.

After receiving a real estate license, most agents go on to join their local board or association of REALTORS® and the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®, the world’s largest professional trade association. They can then call themselves REALTORS®. The term “REALTOR®” is a registered collective membership mark that identifies a real estate professional who is a member of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® and subscribes to its strict Code of Ethics (which in many cases goes beyond state law).

In the Staten Island area, it is the REALTOR® who shares information on the homes they are marketing, through a Multiple Listing Service (MLS). Working with a REALTOR® who belongs to an MLS will give you access to the greatest number of homes.

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Using an Agent and the Obligations That are Owed to You
An agent is bound by certain legal obligations. Traditionally, these common-law obligations are to:
  1. Put the client’s interests above anyone else’s;
  2. Keep the client’s information confidential;
  3. Obey the client’s lawful instructions;
  4. Report to the client anything that would be useful; and
  5. Account to the client for any money involved. NOTE: A REALTOR® is held to an even higher standard of conduct under the NAR’s Code of Ethics.In recent years, state laws have been passed setting up various duties for different types of agents. As you start working with a REALTOR®, ask for a clear explanation of your state’s current regulations, so that you will know where you stand on these important matters. [Back to top]
    How to Evaluate an Agent
    In making your decision to work with an agent, there are certain questions you should ask when evaluating a potential agent.

    The first question you should ask is whether the agent is a REALTOR® . You should then ask:

    1. Does the agent have an active real estate license in good standing? (to find this information, you can check with your state’s governing agency)
    2. Does the agent belong to the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) and/or a reliable online home buyer’s search service? (Multiple Listing Services are cooperative information networks of REALTORS® that provide descriptions of most of the houses for sale in a particular region.)
    3. What real estate designations does the agent hold?
    4. Which party is he or she representing–you or the seller? The discussion is supposed to occur early on, at “first serious contact” with you. The agent should discuss your state’s particular definitions of agency, so you’ll know where you stand.
    5. In exchange for your commitment, how will the agent help you accomplish your goals?

Show you homes that meet your requirements and provide you with a list of the properties he or she is showing you? [Back to top]

 



Choose a Neighborhood
With so many homes on the market you’ll never get anywhere unless you narrow your choices. You can begin this process by first identifying one or a few neighborhoods that are right for you by:
Factors to Consider When Evaluating a Neighborhood
When evaluating a neighborhood, you should investigate local conditions. Depending on your own particular needs and tastes, some of the following factors may be more important considerations than others:
  1. Quality of schools
  2. Property values
  3. Traffic
  4. Crime rate
  5. Future construction
  6. Proximity to: Schools, Employment, Hospitals, Shops, Public transportation, Cultural Activities (museums, concerts, theaters, etc.), Prisons, Freeways, Airports, Beaches, Parks, Stadiums

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Neighborhood Search Strategies
If you’re a first time-buyer with limited financial resources, it’s a wise purchasing strategy to buy a home that meets your primary needs in the best neighborhood that fits within your price range.

You can maximize your home purchase location by incorporating some of the following strategies into your neighborhood search:

  1. Look for communities that are likely to become “hot neighborhoods” in the coming years. They can often be discovered on the periphery of the most continuously desirable areas.
  2. Look for a home in a good neighborhood that is a bit farther out of the city. If commuting is a concern, purchase a home that is close to public transportation.
  3. Look at the neighborhood demand by asking your REALTOR® whether multiple offers are being made, whether the gap between the list price and sale price is decreasing, and whether there is active community involvement. You can also drive around neighborhoods and see how many “sale pending” and “sold” signs there are in a particular area.
  4. Look into purchasing a condominium or co-op, rather than a house, in a desirable neighborhood. This way you still may be able to purchase in a prime area that you otherwise could not afford.

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Choose a Home
Once you’ve settled on a couple of neighborhoods for your search, it’s time to pick out a few homes to view. Refer back to your Wish List and see which features are absolute requirements and those amenities you’d like to have if possible. When narrowing down your home search, consider:

Types of Homes
In addition to single family homes (one home per lot), there are other forms of homeownership:

Multi-Family Homes: Some buyers, particularly first-timers, start with multiple family dwellings, so they’ll have rental income to help with their costs. Many mortgage plans, including VA and FHA loans, can be used for buildings with up to four units, if the buyer intends to occupy one of them.

Condominiums: With a condo, you own “from the plaster in” just as you would a single house. You also own a certain percentage of the “common elements”–staircases, sidewalks, roofs and the like. Monthly charges pay your share of taxes and insurance on those elements, as well as repairs and maintenance. A homeowners association administers the development.

Co-ops:

In a few cities, cooperative apartments are common. With those, you purchase shares in a corporation that owns the whole building, and you receive a lease to your own apartment. A board of directors supervises management. Monthly charges include your share of an overall mortgage
on the building.

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Home Purchase Considerations
Most buyers’ first consideration, after neighborhoods are chosen, is the number of bedrooms. As you begin to view homes, keep the following purchase and resale considerations in mind:
  1. Weigh your needs, purchase and maintenance budgets, and personal tastes in deciding whether you want a home that’s a newly constructed home, an older home or a home that requires some work, or a “fixer-upper.”
  2. One-bedroom condos are more difficult to resell than two-bedroom ones;
  3. Two-bedroom/one-bath single houses generally have less appeal than three or more bedroom houses to many buyers, and therefore less appreciation potential;
  4. Homes with “curb appeal” (a well-maintained, attractive, and charming view-from the street appearance) are the easiest to resell;
  5. When re-sale is a possibility, don’t buy the most expensive house on the street, or anything that is unusual or unique; and
  6. The biggest, most expensive house on the block is not usually considered to be the best investment. The best investment potential is traditionally found in a lesser expensive, more moderately sized home on the street. [Back to top]
    Home Comparison Chart
    While house-hunting, it’s a good idea to make notes about what you see because viewing several houses at a time can be confusing.
    What to do When You’ve Found the Right Home
    Before you begin the home buying process, resolve to act promptly when you find the right house.

    Every REALTOR® has stories to tell about a couple who looked far and wide for their dream home, finally found it, and then revealed that “we always promised my Dad we’d sleep on it, so we’ll make an offer tomorrow.” Many times the story has a sad ending–someone else came in that evening with an offer that was accepted. TIP: Resolve at this point that you will act decisively when you find the house that’s clearly right for you. This is particularly important, after a long search or if the house is newly listed and/or under-priced. So, now you can
    Find a Home &
    Find a REALTOR® and begin your process.

    100 QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT BUYING A NEW HOME1. HOW DO I KNOW IF I’M READY TO BUY A HOME?You can find out by asking yourself some questions:

    Do I have a steady source of income (usually a job)? Have I been employed on a regular basis for the last 2-3 years? Is my current income reliable?
    Do I have a good record of paying my bills?
    Do I have few outstanding long-term debts, like car payments?
    Do I have money saved for a down payment?
    Do I have the ability to pay a mortgage every month, plus additional costs?

    If you can answer “yes” to these questions, you are probably ready to buy your own home.
    2. HOW DO I BEGIN THE PROCESS OF BUYING A HOME?Start by thinking about your situation. Are you ready to buy a home? How much can you afford in a monthly mortgage payment (see Question 4 for help)? How much space do you need? What areas of town do you like? After you answer these questions, make a “To Do” list and start doing casual research. Talk to friends and family, drive through neighborhoods, and look in the “Homes” section of the newspaper.3. HOW DOES PURCHASING A HOME COMPARE WITH RENTING?The two don’t really compare at all. The one advantage of renting is being generally free of most maintenance responsibilities. But by renting, you lose the chance to build equity, take advantage of tax benefits, and protect yourself against rent increases. Also, you may not be free to decorate without permission and may be at the mercy of the landlord for housing.Owning a home has many benefits. When you make a mortgage payment, you are building equity. And that’s an investment. Owning a home also qualifies you for tax breaks that assist you in dealing with your new financial responsibilities- like insurance, real estate taxes, and upkeep- which can be substantial. But given the freedom, stability, and security of owning your own home, they are worth it.4. HOW DOES THE LENDER DECIDE THE MAXIMUM LOAN AMOUNT THAT CAN AFFORD?The lender considers your debt-to-income ratio, which is a comparison of your gross (pre-tax) income to housing and non-housing expenses. Non-housing expenses include such long-term debts as car or student loan payments, alimony, or child support. According to the FHA,monthly mortgage payments should be no more than 29% of gross income, while the mortgage payment, combined with non-housing expenses, 4 should total no more than 41% of income. The lender also considers cash available for down payment and closing costs, credit history, etc. when determining your maximum loan amount.5. HOW DO I SELECT THE RIGHT REAL ESTATE AGENT?Start by asking family and friends if they can recommend an agent. Compile a list of several agents and talk to each before choosing one. Look for an agent who listens well and understands your needs, and whose judgment you trust. The ideal agent knows the local area well and has resources and contacts to help you in your search. Overall, you want to choose an agent that makes you feel comfortable and can provide all the knowledge and services you need.6. HOW CAN I DETERMINE MY HOUSING NEEDS BEFORE I BEGIN THE SEARCH?Your home should fit way you live, with spaces and features that appeal to the whole family. Before you begin looking at homes, make a list of your priorities – things like location and size. Should the house be close to certain schools? your job? to public transportation? How large should the house be? What type of lot do you prefer? What kinds of amenities are you looking for? Establish a set of minimum requirements and a ‘wish list.” Minimum requirements are things that a house must have for you to consider it, while a “wish list” covers things that you’d like to have but aren’t essential.FINDING YOUR HOME7. WHAT SHOULD I LOOK FOR WHEN DECIDING ON A COMMUNITY?Select a community that will allow you to best live your daily life. Many people choose communities based on schools. Do you want access to shopping and public transportation? Is access to local facilities like libraries and museums important to you? Or do you prefer the peace and quiet of a rural community? When you find places that you like, talk to people that live there. They know the most about the area and will be your future neighbors. More than anything, you want a neighborhood where you feel comfortable in.8. WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I’M FEELING EXCLUDED FROM CERTAIN NEIGHBORHOODS?Immediately contact the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) if you ever feel excluded from a neighborhood or particular house. Also, contact HUD if you believe you are being discriminated against on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, nationality, familial status, or disability. HUD’s Office of Fair Housing has a hotline for reporting incidents of discrimination: 1-800-669-9777 (and 1-800-927-9275 for the hearing impaired).9. HOW CAN I FIND OUT ABOUT LOCAL SCHOOLS?You can get information about school systems by contacting the city or county school board or the local schools. Your real estate agent may also be knowledgeable about schools in the area.10. HOW CAN I FIND OUT ABOUT COMMUNITY RESOURCES?Contact the local chamber of commerce for promotional literature or talk to your real estate agent about welcome kits, maps, and other information. You may also want to visit the local library. It can be an excellent source for information on local events and resources, and the librarians will probably be able to answer many of the questions you have.11. HOW CAN I FIND OUT HOW MUCH HOMES ARE SELLING FOR IN CERTAIN COMMUNITIES AND NEIGHBORHOODS?Your real estate agent can give you a ballpark figure by showing you comparable listings. If you are working with a real estate professional, they may have access to comparable sales maintained on a database.12. HOW CAN I FIND INFORMATION ON THE PROPERTY TAX LIABILITY?The total amount of the previous year’s property taxes is usually included in the listing information. If it’s not, ask the seller for a tax receipt or contact the local assessor’s off ice. Tax rates can change from year to year, so these figures may be approximate.13. WHAT OTHER TAX ISSUES SHOULD I TAKE INTO CONSIDERATION?Keep in mind that your mortgage interest and real estate taxes will be deductible. A qualified real estate professional can give you more details on other tax benefits and liabilities,14. IS AN OLDER HOME A BETTER VALUE THAN A NEW ONE?There isn’t a definitive answer to this question. You should look at each home for its individual characteristics. Generally, older homes may be in more established neighborhoods, offer more ambiance, and have lower property tax rates. People who buy older homes, however, shouldn’t mind maintaining their home and making some repairs. Newer homes tend to use more modern architecture and systems, are usually easier to maintain, and may be more energy-efficient. People who buy new homes often don’t want to worry initially about upkeep and repairs.15. WHAT SHOULD I LOOK FOR WHEN WALKING THROUGH A HOME?In addition to comparing the home to your minimum requirement and wish lists, use the HUD Home Scorecard and consider the following:

    Is there enough room for both the present and the future?
    Are there enough bedrooms and bathrooms?
    Is the house structurally sound?
    Do the mechanical systems and appliances work?
    Is the yard big enough?
    Do you like the floor plan?
    Will your furniture fit in the space? Is there enough storage space? (Bring a tape measure to better answer these questions.)
    Does anything need to repaired or replaced? Will the seller repair or replace the items?
    Imagine the house in good weather and bad, and in each season. Will you be happy with it year-round?

    Take your time and think carefully about each house you see. Ask your real estate agent to point out the pros and cons of each home from a professional standpoint.16. WHAT QUESTIONS SHOULD I ASK WHEN LOOKING AT HOMES?Many of your questions should focus on potential problems and maintenance issues. Does anything need to be replaced? What things require ongoing maintenance (e.g., paint, roof, HVAC, appliances, carpet)? Also ask about the house and neighborhood, focusing on quality of life issues. Be sure the seller’s or real estate agent’s answers are clear and complete. Ask questions until you understand all of the information they’ve given. Making a list of questions ahead of time will help you organize your thoughts and arrange all of the information you receive. The HUD Home Scorecard can help you develop your question list.17. HOW CAN I KEEP TRACK OF ALL THE HOMES I SEE?If possible, take photographs of each house: the outside, the major rooms, the yard, and extra features that you like or ones you see as potential problems. And don’t hesitate to return for a second look. Use the HUD Home Scorecard to organize your photos and notes for each house.18. HOW MANY HOMES SHOULD I CONSIDER BEFORE CHOOSING ONE?There isn’t a set number of houses you should see before you decide. Visit as many as it takes to find the one you want. On average, homebuyers see 15 houses before choosing one. Just be sure to communicate often with your real estate agent about everything you’re looking for. It will help avoid wasting your time.YOU’VE FOUND IT19. WHAT DOES A HOME INSPECTOR DO, AND HOW DOES AN INSPECTION FIGURE IN THE PURCHASE OF A HOME?An inspector checks the safety of your potential new home. Home Inspectors focus especially on the structure, construction, and mechanical systems of the house and will make you aware of only repairs,that are needed.The Inspector does not evaluate whether or not you’re getting good value for your money. Generally, an inspector checks (and gives prices for repairs on): the electrical system, plumbing and waste disposal, the water heater, insulation and Ventilation, the HVAC system, water source and quality, the potential presence of pests, the foundation, doors, windows, ceilings, walls, floors, and roof. Be sure to hire a home inspector that is qualified and experienced.It’s a good idea to have an inspection before you sign a written offer since, once the deal is closed, you’ve bought the house as is.” Or, you may want to include an inspection clause in the offer when negotiating for a home. An inspection t clause gives you an ‘out” on buying the house if serious problems are found,or gives you the ability to renegotiate the purchase price if repairs are needed. An inspection clause can also specify that the seller must fix the problem(s) before you purchase the house.20. DO I NEED TO BE THERE FOR THE INSPECTION?It’s not required, but it’s a good idea. Following the inspection, the home inspector will be able to answer questions about the report and any problem areas. This is also an opportunity to hear an objective opinion on the home you’d I like to purchase and it is a good time to ask general, maintenance questions.21. ARE OTHER TYPES OF INSPECTIONS REQUIRED?If your home inspector discovers a serious problem a more specific Inspection may be recommended. It’s a good idea to consider having your home inspected for the presence of a variety of health-related risks like radon gas asbestos, or possible problems with the water or waste disposal system.22. HOW CAN I PROTECT MY FAMILY FROM LEAD IN THE HOME?If the house you’re considering was built before 1978 and you have children under the age of seven, you will want to have an inspection for lead-based point. It’s important to know that lead flakes from paint can be present in both the home and in the soil surrounding the house. The problem can be fixed temporarily by repairing damaged paint surfaces or planting grass over effected soil. Hiring a lead abatement contractor to remove paint chips and seal damaged areas will fix the problem permanently.23. ARE POWER LINES A HEALTH HAZARD?There are no definitive research findings that indicate exposure to power lines results in greater instances of disease or illness.24. DO I NEED A LAWYER TO BUY A HOME?Laws vary by state. Some states require a lawyer to assist in several aspects of the home buying process while other states do not, as long as a qualified real estate professional is involved. Even if your state doesn’t require one, you may want to hire a lawyer to help with the complex paperwork and legal contracts. A lawyer can review contracts, make you aware of special considerations, and assist you with the closing process. Your real estate agent may be able to recommend a lawyer. If not, shop around. Find out what services are provided for what fee, and whether the attorney is experienced at representing homebuyers.25. DO I REALLY NEED HOMEOWNER’S INSURANCE?Yes. A paid homeowner’s insurance policy (or a paid receipt for one) is required at closing, so arrangements will have to be made prior to that day. Plus, involving the insurance agent early in the home buying process can save you money. Insurance agents are a great resource for information on home safety and they can give tips on how to keep insurance premiums low.26. WHAT STEPS COULD I TAKE TO LOWER MY HOMEOWNER’S INSURANCE COSTS?Be sure to shop around among several insurance companies. Also, consider the cost of insurance when you look at homes. Newer homes and homes constructed with materials like brick tend to have lower premiums. Think about avoiding areas prone to natural disasters, like flooding. Choose a home with a fire hydrant or a fire department nearby.27. IS THE HOME LOCATED IN A FLOOD PLAIN?Your real estate agent or lender can help you answer this question. If you live in a flood plain, the lender will require that you have flood insurance before lending any money to you. But if you live near a flood plain, you may choose whether or not to get flood insurance coverage for your home. Work with an insurance agent to construct a policy that fits your needs.28. WHAT OTHER ISSUES SHOULD I CONSIDER BEFORE I BUY MY HOME?Always check to see if the house is in a low-lying area, in a high-risk area for natural disasters (like earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, etc.), or in a hazardous materials area. Be sure the house meets building codes. Also consider local zoning laws, which could affect remodeling or making an addition in the future. Your real estate agent should be able to help you with these questions.29. HOW DO I MAKE AN OFFER?Your real estate agent will assist you in making an offer, which will include the following information:

    Complete legal description of the property
    Amount of earnest money
    Down payment and financing details
    Proposed move-in date
    Price you are offering
    Proposed closing date
    Length of time the offer is valid
    Details of the deal

    Remember that a sale commitment depends on negotiating a satisfactory contract with the seller, not just Making an offer.Other ways to lower ins-insurance costs include insuring your home and car(s) with the same company, increasing home security, and seeking group coverage through alumni or business associations. Insurance costs are always lowered by raising your deductibles, but this exposes you to a higher out-of-pocket cost if you have to file a claim.30. HOW DO I DETERMINE THE INITIAL OFFER?Unless you have a buyer’s agent, remember that the agent works for the seller. Make a point of asking him or her to keep your discussions and information confidential. Listen to your real estate agent’s advice, but follow your own instincts on deciding a fair price. Calculating your offer should involve several factors: what homes sell for in the area, the home’s condition, how long it’s been on the market, financing terms, and the seller’s situation. By the time you’re ready to make an offer, you should have a good idea of what the home is worth and what you can afford. And, be prepared for give-and-take negotiation, which is very common when buying a home. The buyer and seller may often go back and forth until they can agree on a price.31. WHAT IS EARNEST MONEY? HOW MUCH SHOULD I SET ASIDE?Earnest money is money put down to demonstrate your seriousness about buying a home. It must be substantial enough to demonstrate good faith and is usually between 1-5% of the purchase price (though the amount can vary with local customs and conditions). If your offer is accepted, the earnest money becomes part of your down payment or closing costs. If the offer is rejected, your money is returned to you. If you back out of a deal, you may forfeit the entire amount.32. WHAT ARE “HOME WARRANTIES”, AND SHOULD I CONSIDER THEM?Home warranties offer you protection for a specific period of time (e.g., one year) against potentially costly problems, like unexpected repairs on appliances or home systems, which are not covered by homeowner’s insurance. Warranties are becoming more popular because they offer protection during the time immediately following the purchase of a home, a time when many people find themselves cash-strapped.GENERAL FINANCING QUESTIONS:THE BASICS33. WHAT IS A MORTGAGE?Generally speaking, a mortgage is a loan obtained to purchase real estate. The “mortgage” itself is a lien (a legal claim) on the home or property that secures the promise to pay the debt. All mortgages have two features in common: principal and interest.34. WHAT IS A LOAN TO VALUE (LTV) HOW DOES IT DETERMINE THE SIZE OF MY LOAN?The loan to value ratio is the amount of money you borrow compared with the price or appraised value of the home you are purchasing. Each loan has a specific LTV limit. For example: With a 95% LTV loan on a home priced at $50,000, you could borrow up to $47,500 (95% of $50,000), and would have to pay,$2,500 as a down payment.The LTV ratio reflects the amount of equity borrowers have in their homes. The higher the LTV the less cash homebuyers are required to pay out of their own funds. So, to protect lenders against potential loss in case of default, higher LTV loans (80% or more) usually require mortgage insurance policy.35. WHAT TYPES OF LOANS ARE AVAILABLE AND WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF EACH?Fixed Rate Mortgages: Payments remain the same for the the life of the loanTypes

    15-year
    30-year

    Advantages

    Predictable
    Housing cost remains unaffected by interest rate changes and inflation.

    Adjustable Rate Mortgages (ARMS): Payments increase or decrease on a regular schedule with changes in interest rates; increases subject to limitsTypes

    Balloon Mortgage- Offers very low rates for an Initial period of time (usually 5, 7, or 10 years); when time has elapsed, the balance is clue or refinanced (though not automatically)
    Two-Step Mortgage- Interest rate adjusts only once and remains the same for the life of the loan
    ARMS linked to a specific index or margin

    Advantages

    Generally offer lower initial interest rates
    Monthly payments can be lower
    May allow borrower to qualify for a larger loan amount

    36. WHEN DO ARMS MAKE SENSE?An ARM may make sense If you are confident that your income will increase steadily over the years or if you anticipate a move in the near future and aren’t concerned about potential increases in interest rates.37. WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF 15- AND 30-YEAR LOAN TERMS?30-Year:

    In the first 23 years of the loan, more interest is paid off than principal, meaning larger tax deductions.
    As inflation and costs of living increase, mortgage payments become a smaller part of overall expenses.

    15-year:

    Loan is usually made at a lower interest rate.
    Equity is built faster because early payments pay more principal.

    38. CAN I PAY OFF MY LOAN AHEAD OF SCHEDULE?Yes. By sending in extra money each month or making an extra payment at the end of the year, you can accelerate the process of paying off the loan. When you send extra money, be sure to indicate that the excess payment is to be applied to the principal. Most lenders allow loan prepayment, though you may have to pay a prepayment penalty to do so. Ask your lender for details.39. ARE THERE SPECIAL MORTGAGES FOR FIRST-TIME HOMEBUYERS?Yes. Lenders now offer several affordable mortgage options which can help first-time homebuyers overcome obstacles that made purchasing a home difficult in the past. Lenders may now be able to help borrowers who don’t have a lot of money saved for the down payment and closing costs, have no or a poor credit history, have quite a bit of long-term debt, or have experienced income irregularities.40. HOW LARGE OF A DOWN PAYMENT DO I NEED?There are mortgage options now available that only require a down payment of 5% or less of the purchase price. But the larger the down payment, the less you have to borrow, and the more equity you’ll have. Mortgages with less than a 20% down payment generally require a mortgage insurance policy to secure the loan. When considering the size of your down payment, consider that you’ll also need money for closing costs, moving expenses, and – possibly -repairs and decorating.41. WHAT IS INCLUDED IN A MONTHLY MORTGAGE PAYMENT?The monthly mortgage payment mainly pays off principal and interest. But most lenders also include local real estate taxes, homeowner’s insurance, and mortgage insurance (if applicable).42. WHAT FACTORS AFFECT MORTGAGE PAYMENTS?The amount of the down payment, the size of the mortgage loan, the interest rate, the length of the repayment term and payment schedule will all affect the size of your mortgage payment.43. HOW DOES THE INTEREST RATE FACTOR IN SECURING A MORTGAGE LOAN?A lower interest rate allows you to borrow more money than a high rate with the some monthly payment. Interest rates can fluctuate as you shop for a loan, so ask-lenders if they offer a rate “lock-in”which guarantees a specific interest rate for a certain period of time. Remember that a lender must disclose the Annual Percentage Rate (APR) of a loan to you. The APR shows the cost of a mortgage loan by expressing it in terms of a yearly interest rate. It is generally higher than the interest rate because it also includes the cost of points, mortgage insurance, and other fees included in the loan.44. WHAT HAPPENS IF INTEREST RATES DECREASE AND I HAVE A FIXED RATE LOAN?If interest rates drop significantly, you may want to investigate refinancing. Most experts agree that if you plan to be in your house for at least 18 months and you can get a rate 2% less than your current one, refinancing is smart. Refinancing may, however, involve paying many of the same fees paid at the original closing, plus origination and application fees.45. WHAT ARE DISCOUNT POINTS?Discount points allow you to lower your interest rate. They are essentially prepaid interest, With each point equaling 1% of the total loan amount. Generally, for each point paid on a 30-year mortgage, the interest rate is reduced by 1/8 (or.125) of a percentage point. When shopping for loans, ask lenders for an interest rate with 0 points and then see how much the rate decreases With each point paid. Discount points are smart if you plan to stay in a home for some time since they can lower the monthly loan payment. Points are tax deductible when you purchase a home and you may be able to negotiate for the seller to pay for some of them.46. WHAT IS AN ESCROW ACCOUNT? DO I NEED ONE?Established by your lender, an escrow account is a place to set aside a portion of your monthly mortgage payment to cover annual charges for homeowner’s insurance, mortgage insurance (if applicable), and property taxes. Escrow accounts are a good idea because they assure money will always be available for these payments. If you use an escrow account to pay property tax or homeowner’s insurance, make sure you are not penalized for late payments since it is the lender’s responsibility to make those payments.FIRST STEPS47. WHAT STEPS NEED TO BE TAKEN TO SECURE A LOAN?The first step in securing a loan is to complete a loan application. To do so, you’ll need the following information.

    Pay stubs for the past 2-3 months
    W-2 forms for the past 2 years
    Information on long-term debts
    Recent bank statements
    tax returns for the past 2 years
    Proof of any other income
    Address and description of the property you wish to buy
    Sales contract

    During the application process, the lender will order a report on your credit history and a professional appraisal of the property you want to purchase. The application process typically takes between 1-6 weeks.48. HOW DO I CHOOSE THE RIGHT LENDER FOR ME?Choose your lender carefully. Look for financial stability and a reputation for customer satisfaction. Be sure to choose a company that gives helpful advice and that makes you feel comfortable. A lender that has the authority to approve and process your loan locally is preferable, since it will be easier for you to monitor the status of your application and ask questions. Plus, it’s beneficial when the lender knows home values and conditions in the local area. Do research and ask family, friends, and your real estate agent for recommendations.49. HOW ARE PRE-QUALIFYING AND PRE-APPROVAL DIFFERENT?Pre-qualification is an informal way to see how much you maybe able to borrow. You can be ‘pre-qualified’ over the phone with no paperwork by telling a lender your income, your long-term debts, and how large a down payment you can afford. Without any obligation, this helps you arrive at a ballpark figure of the amount you may have available to spend on a house.Pre-approval is a lender’s actual commitment to lend to you. It involves assembling the financial records mentioned in Question 47 (Without the property description and sales contract) and going through a preliminary approval process. Pre-approval gives you a definite idea of what you can afford and shows sellers that you are serious about buying.50. HOW CAN I FIND OUT INFORMATION ABOUT MY CREDIT HISTORY?There are three major credit reporting companies: Equifax, Experian, and Trans Union. Obtaining your credit report is as easy as calling and requesting one. Once you receive the report, it’s important to verify its accuracy. Double check the “high credit limit,”‘total loan,” and ‘past due” columns. It’s a good idea to get copies from all three companies to assure there are no mistakes since any of the three could be providing a report to your lender. Fees, ranging from $5-$20, are usually charged to issue credit reports but some states permit citizens to acquire a free one. Contact the reporting companies at the numbers listed for more information.CREDIT REPORTING COMPANIES

    Company Name Phone Number
    Experian 1-888-397-3742
    Equifax 1-800-685-1111
    Trans Union 1-800-916-8800

    51. WHAT IF I FIND A MISTAKE IN MY CREDIT HISTORY?Simple mistakes are easily corrected by writing to the reporting company, pointing out the error, and providing proof of the mistake. You can also request to have your own comments added to explain problems. For example, if you made a payment late due to illness, explain that for the record. Lenders are usually understanding about legitimate problems.52. WHAT IS A CREDIT BUREAU SCORE AND HOW DO LENDERS USE THEM?A credit bureau score is a number, based upon your credit history, that represents the possibility that you will be unable to repay a loan. Lenders use it to determine your ability to qualify for a mortgage loan. The better the score, the better your chances are of getting a loan. Ask your lender for details.53. HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY SCORE?There are no easy ways to improve your credit score, but you can work to keep it acceptable by maintaining a good credit history. This means paying your bills on time and not overextending yourself by buying more than you can afford.FINDING the RIGHT LOAN for YOU54. HOW DO I CHOOSE THE BEST LOAN – PROGRAM FOR ME?Your personal situation will determine the best kind of loan for you. By asking yourself a few questions, you can help narrow your search among the many options available and discover which loan suits you best.

    Do you expect your finances to changeover the next few years?
    Are you planning to live in this home for a long period of time?
    Are you comfortable with the idea of a changing mortgage payment amount?
    Do you wish to be free of mortgage debt as your children approach college age or as you prepare for retirement?

    Your lender can help you use your answers to questions such as these to decide which loan best fits your needs.55. WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO COMPARE LOAN TERMS BETWEEN LENDERS?First, devise a checklist for the information from each lending institution. You should include the company’s name and basic information, the type of mortgage, minimum down payment required, interest rate and points, closing costs, loan processing time, and whether prepayment is allowed.Speak with companies by phone or in person. Be sure to call every lender on the list the same day, as interest rates can fluctuate daily. In addition to doing your own research, your real estate agent may have access to a database of lender and mortgage options. Though your agent may primarily be affiliated with a particular lending institution, he or she may also be able to suggest a variety of different lender options to you.56. ARE THERE ANY COSTS OR FEES ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOAN ORIGINATION PROCESS?Yes. When you turn in your application, you’ll be required to pay a loan application fee to cover the costs of underwriting the loan. This fee pays for the home appraisal, a copy of your credit report, and any additional charges that may be necessary. The application fee is generally non-refundable.57. WHAT IS RESPA?RESPA stands for Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act. It requires lenders to disclose information to potential customers throughout the mortgage process, By doing so, it protects borrowers from abuses by lending institutions. RESPA mandates that lenders fully inform borrowers about all closing costs, lender servicing and escrow account practices, and business relationships between closing service providers and other parties to the transaction.For more information on RESPA, or call 1-800-569-4287 for a local counseling referral.58. WHAT IS A GOOD FAITH ESTIMATE, AND HOW DOES IT HELP ME?It’s an estimate that lists all fees paid before closing, all closing costs, and any escrow costs you will encounter when purchasing a home. The lender must supply it within three days of your application so that you can make accurate judgments when shopping for a loan.59. BESIDES RESPA, DOES THE LENDER HAVE ANY ADDITIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES?Lenders are not allowed to discriminate in any way against potential borrowers. If you believe a lender is refusing to provide his or her services to you on the basis of race, color, nationality, religion, sex, familial status, or disability, contact HUD’s Office of Fair Housing at 1-800-669-9777 (or 1-800-927-9275 for the hearing impaired).60. WHAT RESPONSIBILITIES DO I HAVE DURING THE LENDING PROCESS?To ensure you won’t fall victim to loan fraud, be sure to follow all of these steps as you apply for a loan:

    Be sure to read and understand everything before you sign.
    Refuse to sign any blank documents.
    Do not buy property for someone else.
    Do not overstate your income.
    Do not overstate how long you have been employed.
    Do not overstate your assets.
    Accurately report your debts.
    Do not change your income tax returns for any reason. Tell the whole truth about gifts. Do not list fake co-borrowers on your loan application.
    Be truthful about your credit problems, past and present.
    Be honest about your intention to occupy the house
    Do not provide false supporting documents.

    CLOSING61. WHAT HAPPENS AFTER I’VE APPLIED FOR MY LOAN?It usually takes a lender between 1-6 weeks to complete the evaluation of your application. Its not unusual for the lender to ask for more information once the application has been submitted. The sooner you can provide the information, the faster your application will be processed. Once all the information has been verified the lender will call you to let you know the outcome of your application. If the loan is approved, a closing date is set up and the lender will review the closing with you. And after closing, you’ll be able to move into your new home.62. WHAT SHOULD I LOOK OUT FOR DURING THE FINAL WALK-THROUGH?This will likely be the first opportunity to examine the house without furniture, giving you a clear view of everything. Check the walls and ceilings carefully, as well as any work the seller agreed to do in response to the inspection. Any problems discovered previously that you find uncorrected should be brought up prior to closing. It is the seller’s responsibility to fix them.63. WHAT MAKES UP CLOSING COST?There may be closing cost customary or unique to a certain locality, but closing cost are usually made up of the following:

    Attorney’s or escrow fees (Yours and your lender’s if applicable)
    Property taxes (to cover tax period to date)
    Interest (paid from date of closing to 30 days before first monthly payment)
    Loan Origination fee (covers lenders administrative cost)
    Recording fees
    Survey fee
    First premium of mortgage Insurance (if applicable)
    Title Insurance (yours and lender’s)
    Loan discount points
    First payment to escrow account for future real estate taxes and insurance
    Paid receipt for homeowner’s insurance policy (and fire and flood insurance if applicable)
    Any documentation preparation fees

    64. WHAT CAN I EXPECT TO HAPPEN ON CLOSING DAY?You’ll present your paid homeowner’s insurance policy or a binder and receipt showing that the premium has been paid. The closing agent will then list the money you owe the seller (remainder of down payment, prepaid taxes, etc.) and then the money the seller owes you (unpaid taxes and prepaid rent, if applicable). The seller will provide proofs of any inspection, warranties, etc.Once you’re sure you understand all the documentation, you’ll sign the mortgage, agreeing that if you don’t make payments the lender is entitled to sell your property and apply the sale price against the amount you owe plus expenses. You’ll also sign a mortgage note, promising to repay the loan. The seller will give you the title to the house in the form of a signed deed.You’ll pay the lender’s agent all closing costs and, in turn,he or she will provide you with a settlement statement of all the items for which you have paid. The deed and mortgage will then be recorded in the state Registry of Deeds, and you will be a homeowner.65. WHAT DO I GET AT CLOSING?

    Settlement Statement, HUD-1 Form (itemizes services provided and the fees charged; it is filled out by the closing agent and must be given to you at or before closing)
    Truth-in-Lending Statement
    Mortgage Note
    Mortgage or Deed of Trust
    Binding Sales Contract (prepared by the seller; your lawyer should review it)
    Keys to your new home

    HOW CAN HUD and the FHA HELP ME BECOME a HOMEOWNER66. WHAT IS THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT?Also known as HUD, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development was established in 1965 to develop national policies and programs to address housing needs in the U.S. One of HUD’s primary missions is to create a suitable living environment for all Americans by developing and improving the country’s communities and enforcing fair housing laws67. HOW DOES HUD HELP HOMEBUYERS AND HOMEOWNERS?HUD helps people by administering a variety of programs that develop and support affordable housing. Specifically, HUD plays a large role in homeownership by making loans available for lower- and moderate-income families through its FHA mortgage insurance program and its HUD Homes program. HUD owns homes in many communities throughout the U.S. and offers them for sale at attractive prices and economical terms. HUD also seeks to protect consumers through education, Fair Housing Laws, and housing rehabilitation initiatives.68. WHAT IS THE FHA?Now an agency within HUD, the Federal Housing Administration was established in 1934 to advance opportunities for Americans to own homes. By providing private lenders with mortgage insurance, the FHA gives them the security they need to lend to first-time buyers who might not be able to qualify for conventional loans. The FHA has helped more than 26 million Americans buy a home.69. HOW CAN THE FHA ASSIST ME IN BUYING A HOME?The FHA works to make homeownership a possibility for more Americans. With the FHA, you don’t need perfect credit or a high-paying job to qualify for a loan. The FHA also makes loans more accessible by requiring smaller down payments than conventional loans. In fact, an FHA down payment could be as little as a few months rent. And your monthly payments may not be much more than rent.70. HOW IS THE FHA FUNDED?Lender claims paid by the FHA mortgage insurance program are drawn from the Mutual Mortgage Insurance fund. This fund is made up of premiums paid by FHA-insured loan borrowers. No tax dollars are used to fund the program.71. WHO CAN QUALIFY FOR FHA LOANSanyone who meets the credit requirements, can afford the mortgage payments and cash investment, and who plans to use the mortgaged property as a primary residence may apply for an FHA-insured loan.72. WHAT IS THE FHA LOAN LIMIT?FHA loan limits vary throughout the country, from $115,200 in low-cost areas to $208,800 in high-cost areas. The loan maximums for multi-unit homes are higher than those for single units and also vary by area.Because these maximums are linked to the conforming loan limit and average area home prices, FHA loan limits are periodically subject to change. Ask your lender for details and confirmation of current limits.73. WHAT ARE THE STEPS INVOLVED IN THE FHA LOAN PROCESS?With the exception of a few additional forms, the FHA loan application process is similar to that of a conventional loan (see Question 47). With new automation measures, FHA loans may be originated more quickly than before. And, if you don’t prefer a face-to-face meeting, you can apply for an FHA loan via mail, telephone, the Internet, or video conference.74. HOW MUCH INCOME DO I NEED TO HAVE TO QUALIFY FOR AN FHA LOAN?There is no minimum income requirement. But you must prove steady income for at least three years, and demonstrate that you’ve consistently paid your bills on time.75. WHAT QUALIFIES AS AN INCOME SOURCE FOR THE FHA?Seasonal pay, child support, retirement pension payments, unemployment compensation, VA benefits, military pay, Social Security income, alimony, and rent paid by family all qualify as income sources. Part-time pay, overtime, and bonus pay also count as long as they are steady. Special savings plans-such as those set up by a church or community association – qualify, too. Income type is not as important as income steadiness with the FHA.76. CAN I CARRY DEBT AND STILL QUALIFY FOR FHA LOANS?Yes. Short-term debt doesn’t count as long as it can be paid off within 10 months. And some regular expenses, like child care costs, are not considered debt. Talk to your lender or real estate agent about meeting the FHA debt-to-income ratio.77. WHAT IS THE DEBT-TO-INCOME RATIO FOR FHA LOANS?The FHA allows you to use 29% of your income towards housing costs and 41% towards housing expenses and other long-term debt. With a conventional loan, this qualifying ratio allows only 28% toward housing and 36% towards housing and other debt78. CAN I EXCEED THIS RATIO?You may qualify to exceed if you have:

    a large down payment
    a demonstrated ability to pay more toward your housing expenses
    substantial cash reserves
    net worth enough to repay the mortgage regardless of income
    evidence of acceptable credit history or limited credit use
    less-than-maximum mortgage terms
    funds provided by an organization
    a decrease in monthly housing expenses

    79. HOW LARGE A DOWN PAYMENT DO I NEED WITH AN FHA LOAN?You must have a down payment of at least 3% of the purchase price of the home. Most affordable loan programs offered by private lenders require between a 3%-5% down payment, with a minimum of 3% coming directly from the borrower’s own funds.80. WHAT CAN I USE TO PAY THE DOWN PAYMENT AND CLOSING COSTS OF AN FHA LOAN?Besides your own funds, you may use cash gifts or money from a private savings club. If you can do certain repairs and improvements yourself, your labor may be used as part of a down 8 payment (called -sweat equity”). If you are doing a lease purchase, paying extra rent to the seller may also be considered the same as accumulating cash.81. HOW DOES MY CREDIT HISTORY IMPACT MY ABILITY TO QUALIFY?The FHA is generally more flexible than conventional lenders in its qualifying guidelines. In fact, the FHA allows you to re-establish credit if:

    two years have passed since a bankruptcy has been discharged
    all judgments have been paid
    any outstanding tax liens have been satisfied or appropriate arrangements have been made to establish a repayment plan with the IRS or state Department of Revenue
    three years have passed since a foreclosure or a deed-in-lieu has been resolved

    82. CAN I QUALIFY FOR AN FHA LOAN WITHOUT A CREDIT HISTORY?Yes. If you prefer to pay debts in cash or are too young to have established credit, there are other ways to prove your eligibility. Talk to your lender for details.83. WHAT TYPES OF CLOSING COSTS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH FHA-INSURED LOANS?Except for the addition of an FHA mortgage insurance premium, FHA closing costs are similar to those of a conventional loan outlined in Question 63. The FHA requires a single, upfront mortgage insurance premium equal to 2.25% of the mortgage to be paid at closing (or 1.75% if you complete the HELP program- see Question 91). This initial premium may be partially refunded if the loan is paid in full during the first seven years of the loan term. After closing, you will then be responsible for an annual premium – paid monthly – if your mortgage is over 15 years or if you have a 15-year loan with an LTV greater than 90%.84. CAN I ROLL CLOSING COSTS INTO my FHA LOAN?No. Though you can’t roll closing costs into your FHA loan, you may be able to use the amount you pay for them to help satisfy the down payment requirement. Ask your lender for details.85. ARE FHA LOANS ASSUMABLE?Yes. You can assume an existing FHA-insured loan, or, if you are the one deciding to sell, allow a buyer to assume yours. Assuming a loan can be very beneficial, since the process is streamlined and less expensive compared to that for a new loan. Also, assuming a loan can often result in a lower interest rate. The application process consists basically of a credit check and no property appraisal is required. And you must demonstrate that you have enough income to support the mortgage loan. In this way, qualifying to assume a loan is similar to the qualification requirements for a new one.86. WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I CAN’T MAKE A PAYMENT ON LOAN?Call or, write to your lender as soon as possible. Clearly explain the situation and be prepared to provide him or her with financial information.87. ARE THERE ANY OPTIONS IF I FALL BEHIND ON MY LOAN PAYMENTS?Yes. Talk to your lender or a HUD-approved counseling agency for details. Listed below are a few options that may help you get back on track.For FHA loans:

    Keep living in your home to qualify for assistance.
    Contact a HUD-approved housing counseling agency (1-800-569-4287 or TDD: 1-800-483-2209) and cooperate with the counselor/lender trying to help you.
    HUD has a number of special loss mitigation programs available to help you:
    Special Forbearance: Your lender will arrange for a revised repayment plan which may Include temporary reduction or suspension of payments; you can qualify by having an Involuntary reduction in your Income or Increase In living expenses.
    Mortgage Modification: Allows refinance debt and/or extend the term of the your mortgage loan which may reduce your monthly payments; you can qualify if you have recovered from financial problems, but net Income Is less than before.
    Partial Claim: Your lender maybe able to help you obtain an interest-free loan from HUD to bring your mortgage current.
    Pre-foreclosure Sale: Allows you to sell your property and pay off your mortgage loan ,to avoid foreclosure.
    Deed-in lieu of Foreclosure: Lets you voluntarily “give back” your property to the lender; it won’t save your house but will help you avoid the costs, time, and effort of the foreclosure process.
    If you are having difficulty with an-uncooperative lender or feel your loan servicer is not providing you with the most effective loss mitigation options, call the FHA Loss Mitigation Center at (877) 622-8525 for additional help.

    For Conventional Loans:Talk to your lender about specific loss mitigation options. Work directly with him or her to request a “workout packet.” A secondary lender, like Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, may have purchased your loan. Your lender can follow the appropriate guidelines set by Fannie or Freddie to determine the best option for your situation.Fannie Mae does not deal directly with the borrower. They work with the lender to determine the loss mitigation program that best fits your needs.Freddie Mac, like Fannie Mae, will usually only work with the loan servicer. However, if you encounter problems with your lender during the loss mitigation process, you can coil customer service for help at 1-800-FREDDIE (1-800-373-3343).In any loss mitigation situation, it is important to remember a few helpful hints:

    Explore every reasonable alternative to avoid losing your home, but beware of scams. For example, watch out for:

    Equity skimming: a buyer offers to repay the mortgage or sell the property if you sign over the deed and move out.Phony counseling agencies: offer counseling for a fee when it is often given at no charge.

    Don’t sign anything you don’t understand.

    MORTGAGE INSURANCE88. WHAT IS MORTGAGE INSURANCE?Mortgage insurance is a policy that protects lenders against some or most of the losses that result from defaults on home mortgages. It’s required primarily for borrowers making a down payment of less than 20%.89. HOW DOES MORTGAGE INSURANCE WORK? IS IT LIKE HOME OR AUTO INSURANCE?Like home or auto insurance, mortgage insurance requires payment of a premium, is for protection against loss, and is used in the event of an emergency. If a borrower can’t repay an insured mortgage loan as agreed, the lender may foreclose on the property and file a claim with the mortgage insurer for some or most of the total losses.90. DO I NEED MORTGAGE INSURANCE? HOW DO I GET IT?You need mortgage insurance only if you plan to make a down payment of less than 20% of the purchase price of the home. The FHA offers several loan programs that may meet your needs. Ask your lender for details.91. HOW CAN I RECEIVE A DISCOUNT ON THE FHA INITIAL MORTGAGE INSURANCE PREMIUM?Ask your real estate agent or lender for information on the HELP program from the FHA. HELP – Homebuyer Education Learning Program – is structured to help people like you begin the homebuying process. It covers such topics as budgeting, finding a home, getting a loan, and home maintenance. In most cases, completion of this program may entitle you to a reduction in the initial FHA mortgage insurance premium from 2.25% to 1.75% of the purchase price of your new home.92. WHAT IS PMI?PMI stands for Private Mortgage Insurance or Insurer. These are privately-owned companies that provide mortgage insurance. They offer both standard and special affordable programs for borrowers. These companies provide guidelines to lenders that detail the types of loans they will insure. Lenders use these guidelines to determine borrower eligibility. PMI’s usually have stricter qualifying ratios and larger down payment requirements than the FHA, but their premiums are often lower and they insure loans that exceed the FHA limit.FHA PRODUCTS93. WHAT IS A 203(b) LOAN?This is the most commonly used FHA program. It offers a low down payment, flexible qualifying guidelines, limited lender’s fees, and a maximum loan amount.94. WHAT IS A 203(k) LOAN?This is a loan that enables the homebuyer to finance both the purchase and rehabilitation of a home through a single mortgage. A portion of the loan is used to pay off the seller’s existing mortgage and the remainder is placed in an escrow account and released as rehabilitation is completed. Basic guidelines for 203(k) loans are as follows:

    The home must be at least one year old.
    The cost of rehabilitation must be at least $5,000, but the total property value – including the cost of repairs – must fall within the FHA maximum mortgage limit.
    The 203(k) loan must follow many of the 203(b) eligibility requirements.
    Talk to your lender about specific improvement, energy efficiency, and structural guidelines.

    95. WHAT IS AN ENERGY EFFICIENT MORTGAGE (EEM)?The Energy Efficient Mortgage allows a homebuyer to save future money on utility bills. This is done by financing the cost of adding energy-efficiency features to a new or existing home as part of an FHA-insured home purchase. The EEM can be used with both 203(b) and 203(k) loans. Basic guidelines for EEMs are as follows:

    The cost of improvements must be determined by a Home Energy Rating System or by an energy consultant. This cost must be less than the anticipated savings from the improvements.
    One- and two-unit new or existing homes are eligible; condos are not.
    The improvements financed may be 5% of property value or $4,000, whichever is greater. The total must fall within the FHA loan limit.

    96. DELETED.97. WHAT IS A TITLE I LOAN?Given by a Lender and insured by the FHA, a Title I loan is used to make non-luxury renovations and repairs to a home. It offers a manageable interest rate and repayment schedule. Loans are limited to between $5,000 and 20,000. If the loan amount is under 7,500, no lien is required against your home. Ask your lender for details.98. WHAT OTHER LOAN PRODUCTS OR PROGRAMS DOES THE FHA OFFER?The FHA also insures loans for the purchase or rehabilitation of manufactured housing, condominiums, and cooperatives. It also has special programs for urban areas, disaster victims, and members of the armed forces. Insurance for ARMS is also available from the FHA.99. HOW CAN I OBTAIN AN FHA-INSURED LOAN?Contact an FHA-approved lender such as a participating mortgage company, bank, savings and loan association, or thrift. For more information on the FHA and how you can obtain an FHA loan, visit the HUD web site at http://www.hud.gov or call a HUD-approved counseling agency at 1-800-569-4287 or TDD: 1-800-877-8339.